Bagpath

Bagpath: The argument that ensues when a female passenger disagrees with a related driver on the right direction to a place to which they have both driven separately to before. Arguments usually start at a roundabout where they choose entirely opposite routes.

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A Guide to Gloucestershire Place Names and their True Meaning.

This is another in the series from my considered in depth research into this esoteric subject.

Magic day and little yellow jacketed bombers.

A break from the place names for a day, and a brilliant walk in the countryside. Loads of cow parsley and bright sunshine now and again. Walking with my friend Sir Robin Burton of Churchdown, who is always the best of company. We set off on a circular tour from the bottom of the Chalford valley, up through Dimmelsdale ( yes, it does sound like a made up name ) and to the top edge of France Lynch. The area is familar to me as we used to live around there. Over to Oakridge and then across towards the Daneway area but downhill to the canal and river where we stopped under a bridge and Robin sang a great song and about miners with the benefit of what might be termed, canal bridge acoustics.

I took a small video for you to take a look at and listen.

Deserving of a Scotch Egg, we finished our walk back at the bottom of Chalford valley and drove to Miserden where we knew these eggs might be on offer. Unfortunately there were other yellow beasts in the area and as we tucked in wasps were everywhere.

” These are all going to die” was the advice given to me by Robin,

” They are if they come near my scotch egg” I replied. Too many to consider going for a piece of sticky cake, we ended the day there.

Magic day, no stings attached.

Cow parsley in Dimmelsdale.

Nether Westcote

Nether Westcote: Underpants of very poor quality where support is lacking in certain vital areas, like the Labour party in Cirencester.

These can be purchased generally from market stalls, but not from Cirencester market where they tend to specialise in home made jams at eye watering prices. In that respect the two items have something in common. Wearing nether westcots can be eye watering, both to the wearer and anyone who might unfortunately have sight of them.

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A Guide to Gloucestershire Place Names and their True Meaning.

This is another in the series from my considered in depth research into this esoteric subject.

Stancombe

Pitchcombe: Combe is from the latin for dung and in this instance pitchcombe is the word used for the hurling of dung. In particular cow dung that has dried enough for it to be successfully lifted as a complete circle about the size of a pizza, and then thrown.It is thought that Pitchombe preceded Frisbee as a marketing name, but has since fallen out of common parlance.

Stancombe: The stance adopted before delivering a Pitchcombe. Legs wide apart, arms like a windmill in readiness for the launch. Very risky when loaded with the necessary as detritus may emanate and you may not be popular at home, or anywhere for that matter.

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A Guide to Gloucestershire Place Names and their True Meaning.

This is another in the series from my considered in depth research into this esoteric subject. In this case I have featured two places as they are related in meaning.

Ashton Keynes

Ashton Keynes: The way a small boat might sit in the water when waterlogged. An uncomfortable angle. Has developed from its first water association to mean slightly unhinged, so if someone is described as “ a bit ashton keynes” they can be considered to be “lying at an odd angle in the water”. Barmy but not completely.

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A Guide to Gloucestershire Place Names and their True Meaning.

This is another in the series from my considered in depth research
into this esoteric subject.

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Bishops’s Cleeve

Bishop’s Cleeve: The word cleeve is generally thought to relate to the way a valley is formed, so it’s a geographical term. A Cleeve is a wooded valley. How it relates to a Bishop is unknown, could be a favourite walk of the Bishop or possibly a parade through the area by religious people.

A Guide to Gloucestershire Place Names and their True Meaning.

This is another in the series from my considered in depth research into this esoteric subject.

Bishop’s Cleeve is a small town on the edge of Cheltenham quite close to Cheltenham’s Racecourse. Perhaps the Bishop was a gambler?

Burleigh

Burleigh: Generic term to decribe a large fellow, tends to elicit the phrase: “ Moind eem a bigun moind” from onlookers in the Gloucester area. Bigun was the first name used, then it developed to just burleigh. So the phrase more recently would be ” Eeem a burleigh eni?” Meaning in both instances: ” He’s a very large fellow is he not?” Frequents the Kingsholm area in the winter months.

A Guide to Gloucestershire Place Names and their True Meaning.

This is another in the series from my considered in depth research into this esoteric subject.

Bibury

A Guide to Gloucestershire Place Names and their True Meaning.

This is another in the series from my considered in depth research into this esoteric subject.

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Bibury: The walk of a tourist who does not understand what he/she should be doing, or seeing, or indeed why they are where they are at all. Involves walking slowly in one direction and then in another random direction, even the person doing the walking does not understand exactly why or in which direction they might be going. It’s a sorry sight. Pity them.

Common in the Cotswolds. Japanese tourists avoid by following a flag which is even more odd and could even be described as slightly sinister.

Bibury is a small village between Cirencester and Burford, it is populated by wealthy London people and many tourists as a result of its lovely location and buildings.

Hucclecote

One of those parkas your dad or granddad used to own in the 70s that you never bothered to throw away. The undefined fur on the collar is somewhat perished and moth eaten. It has no waterproofing qualities at all and never did, and if mistakenly worn in wet conditions will act like blotting paper. May have the slight smell of patchouli oil, the remnants of a visit to a music festival but more likely to give off the odour of cow manure.

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This is one of many drawings from my Glossary book which is a run down of the true meaing of Gloucestershire place names. They appear every month in Cotswold Life, one of those lifestyle magazines with impossibly glossy interiors and eye wateringly expensive houses.

I’ll put a few of these up in the next few days.