Barbeques and garden machinery, the Germans have it right.

I’m forever being told that I should like barbeques, and I don’t. I certainly don’t much care for ‘having a go’ at doing one myself. This from bitter experience of lighting said fire and then waiting for hours before it got to the right temperature to grill a sausage. Said fire was still glowing at 2.00 in the morning with enough heat to cook a large beast. To say it was a fire risk is only a small understatement. And it’s the sun that brings them out. Any nearly warm sunny day brings out the charcoal and the flames, or the portable gas behemoth that’s been breeding germs in the garage where it was dumped last year when the sun hid for months.

Of course before the barbeque you must pressure wash the patio so that the grease stains will have somewhere to land and guests can mingle around in their best casual stuff that will smell of carbon forever after this day. The sound of this washer is enough to wake anyone in the district wanting a nice Sunday lie in, as if a fire engine was doing a practice quirt in the garden.

Best cut the grass while your at it. Fire up the motor mower and lets get some stripes into those lawns: the British Obsession. It’s all to do with those public schools surrounded by acres of manicured grass so the fee payers can be seen to be getting their money’s worth. For those of you not in the UK reading this, public schools in the UK are private and have to be paid for by the parents. They are not normally called private schools. Grammar schools are state schools where you have to pass an exam to get in and the rest go to secondary schools that are sometimes branded as academies. Some secondary schools were called secondary modern schools, but this title became a little tainted as if they were failures and not very modern at all. Most schools have manicured playing fields but the public ( private ) schools have the huge ones with no weeds at all, and some of the secondaries have sold their fields for cash. Where once lay playing fields now sport “Executive Homes” in roads with country names like “Field Court View”, though there is no view.

I digress.

Barbeques and the operation of garden machinery are as we all know are banned on a Sunday in Germany. If this is fake news then it shouldn’t be and the Germans have it right. OK sausage?

Barbqblog


My love of barbeques is illustrated here from one of the pieces that will be in my exhibition here in Cheltenham at the Gardens Gallery from August 16th to the 22nd.

The British…what are they like?

pontnavigationalskills478sf

THE BRITISH CHARACTER
An innate ability to look forward with hope


My New Year’s resolution of “do some drawing every day” is being strictly adhered to. I was admonished the other day, good word that, better than being ‘told-off’. The reason was that I’d described my drawing as a rough, when the viewer thought it was finished. Well, in common with many other artists, one has never finished a drawing so they can all be described as rough. This is one such.

My journey for the year is to navigate towards a project about the British and I was inspired to start this by coming across a book about a cartoonist called ‘Pont’. His real name was Graham Laidlaw and he died quite young in 1940. A Punch cartoonist of some repute ┬áhe specialised in drawings about the British and their ways of looking at life and living. He’s worth looking up on Wickepedia, his drawings are just lovely.

I’ll be following in his large footsteps and hoping to bring his ideas up to date. Some of them will not need a complete revamp as they are still as true today as they were 60 plus years ago. This drawing is the first to be done and wether or not it makes the final cut will depend on production over the next few months.

I’ll be dropping them into my blogs over the coming months and hope that you enjoy them.