Cheddar, a tasty day out.

I go walking with a good old friend of mine, and one of our favourite meeting places is in the Mendips near to the Cheddar Gorge, and yesterday we were confident of a fine day and some good walking. A reprise of a previous walk down the Cheddar gorge and unfortunately up the other side. Blubells much in evidence for the first part of the walk from Chaterhouse on the top of the hills. It seemed to us strange that these creatures of the woods were still there at this time of year and in the open rather than in a congregation under trees. No matter they were a lovely sight.Bluebelltree

Bluebell

We arrived after a while and a walk through old lead mining area, at the top of the Gorge. We were well kitted with what we call stout walking boots and weatherproofs. The previous day we’d had almost biblical rain and we thought the ground would have been pretty muddy and sodden. It was not. We’ve had so much premanent dry weather our theory was that the land had acted like blotting paper and had soaked up all the moisture.

It was nevertheless a surprise to see two young men and their partners coming the other way with a puchchair and small child. The ground is quite steep and rocky and they were carrying a child in a pushchair, by carrying the pushchair. Female partners were dressed in thin shoes and clothes as if they’d thought it might be a good idea after a spell on the beach at nearby Weston super Mare, or as my satnav called in Weston s Mare. So the satnav does not think it’s that super then?

They would have had to climb out of the Gorge up dozens of steps to get there. One can admire their sense of adventure but not their sense.

Here’s Richard contemplating Weston in the distance. Super view.

It’s not changed that much since our last trip there:

Bluebell fields and a grand day out.

Richontop

 

The Happy Hiker

I’m working on a load of stuff in my old drawers, no panto sniggers please.A series of drawings that I did some years ago that I always meant to finish up. At last I’m doing it and this one just about summed up the latter part of the year for me.This is not quite finished and is at present just the line work, but is really all there.

I’m keen on hiking and walking and this year was a gem for that, with walking in the Orkneys and in the Rockies as the highlights, plus some gems in the Mendips with my chum Richard.If you really want to know more then go and have a look unknownitems.com where I bore for England about them.

I’ve never actually seen anyone do this but it is the way you can feel on a half decent walk in the English countryside.I suspect that the two women in that background are muttering: ” There’s always one”. A fine English expression to sum up anyone who insists on showing off.

Sportshappyhiker396sf

Bishop’s Cleeve, well it could be.

Bishopscleeve3

Bishop’s Cleeve

The word cleeve is generally thought to relate to the way a valley is formed, so it’s a geographical term. So a Cleeve is a wooded valley. How it relates to a Bishop is unknown, could be a favourite walk of the Bishop or possibly a parade through the area by religious people.

Can also mean the dark area between a barmaids full bosom, but this is conjecture.


Another place name meaning, I like the idea that a Bishop would go walking in full regalia through a wooded valley. As you can see from the map here it’s near Woodmancote so my theory about a wooded valley holds weight.

Bishcleeve