Footy Chair

We don’t call football soccer over here, it’s football.

It must have been around 2002 that there was a World Cup tournament as I came accross this drawing when clearing stuff out. It was, I think , for a calendar. I suspect that I got the month when we were in the tournament and this is as anyone will recognise a footy chair. You can tell it’s done a while ago as the computer monitor is a little on the large size. I also borrowed a theme from an earlier project called ” Things to come” when I did a series of drawings about what we could have expected in the future. Ready-chewed food seems to have happened, judging by the amount of processed stuff you can get these days.

I lost the original of this but found a very good 5 x 4 transparency in a drawer with quite a lot of other early works. Getting scans of these proved to be a little tricky but I found this place on the internet that did them and they scanned them all beautifully for me. Massive files that gave my mac a bit of work to do, but the colours very true to the originals, and as in some cases my colour work fades quite a lot after a few years, they are much truer to the originals.For your info the place I found is Treasure Memories , I’d recommend. I suspect that it might be a one man business, perhaps someone who just likes photos and restoring stuff.

Anyhow I thought you might like to check this one out, and as England lost to Germany yet again last night, it seemed right for me to post it. Chair is empty as with all English fans there’s a tendency to wander off into the night at the end of a tournament and contemplate just what might have been.

Footychair4web

 

Umpire of the Sun

umpire-of-the-sun333

I used to be keen on cricket until struck on the head by a ball when just a callow youth. The result of some fearsome fast bowling by one of my sports teachers, who insisted that I keep wicket in the very small area behind the wicket in the cricket nets. The resulting blow put what looked like an egg on my forehead and I suppose these days would be classed as concussion. All he did was get cross with me for failing to catch his fearsome delivery.

It’s a very sunny day but cold out there today and I came across this little drawing which I plan to finish properly one day, like dozens of others. If it was several degrees warmer it would be a perfect cricketing day so I thought this might put you in mind of summer.

For anyone not familiar with cricket, there are two umpires who oversee the game, one at the bowler’s end and one at mid-on, there you are, you’re lost already. It’s no use going any further explaining to anyone who has no knowledge of the game. I have very little myself, suffice to say that in the old days, the umpires also used to serve as a handy clothes peg, wrapped around with the player’s spare hats and jumpers on what was normally a roasting hot day.

Their job is to adjudicate if a batsman is in, or out, if he was judged out then he had to go off and someone else would come in , until they were judged to be out. If they were judged to be not out then they would stay in. In this particular case the umpire is indicating the result of an appeal and the batsmen is out. Another batsman may now come on and will be in until he is out, unless he succeeds in being not out. Owzat?

 

 

 

 

Didbrook

didbrook2sf

A ‘didbrook’ is a blow to the belly which results in the recipient expelling all available oxygen from the body in one breath. It’s a term used often in rugby: ” He got a right old did brook dinner” is a phrase used often by spectators at rugby matches in the Gloucester area.

Didbrook is in actual fact a charming village in the Forest of Dean area of Gloucestershire, but I’m sure I’ve overheard the phrase at ‘the shed’ which is one Gloucester Rugby’s spectator’s stands where many speak like this.

Netball woman, and other sporting moments.

hockeygirlwebThis is another drawing from the archives recently found. It’s from a book called ’43 Unsporting Moments’ and was written with my old collaborator Gordon Thorburn. The book dates from 1996, so getting on a bit now.

I’ll quote here from the text which is about a fixture at a prison:

” This girl, who would have been the dominant personality in any East German field-events team, did not seem especially keen to join in the sport
today. She gave the impression that among her preferred activities was having college girls on toast for breakfast…”

The lady on the outside of the netting is the resident umpire.